Friday, November 7, 2014

Make Learning Your Passion

Management expert Philip B. Crosby once said, "There is a theory of human behaviour that says people subconsciously retard their own intellectual growth. They come to rely on cliches and habits. Once they reach the age of their own personal comfort with the world, they stop learning and their mind runs on idle for the rest of their days. They may progress organisationally, they may be ambitious and eager, and they may even work night and day. But they learn no more."

I think what he said is so true especially if one had secured or reached the position they dreamt of. They may be thinking, "since I had reached my destination, I can then relaxed." That's when one is in a comfort zone without realising it. And that's when you don't allow yourself to learn anymore.

A lot of us who has been working for a while might also be at that stage. Say, holding the same position in a comfortably secured company, you felt you are in the best place, do whatever that's required day in day out, don't get into conflict with anyone and wished you hold onto your job till the retirement day. That's when you won't see the need to upgrade your skills or learn new things.

It's important to realise early that when you are stagnant, you are actually regressing. We have no choice but to move forward. Even when the job scope might still be the same, we have to find new ways to do things differently or creatively.

Personally, I discover one of the ways to cultivate that learning habit is to try it out in your own life. Don't wait for the management to pass you something to pick up. Start picking up a new interest or hobby so that your mind is trained to absorb new knowledge and skills at all times.

I recall picking up golfing some time back. It was a tough sports for me but in the process of picking up the game, I train my mind to learn all the tricks of golfing and it keeps my mind alert and get me to observe things that I might not have noticed previously. It helps in my job. Later on, I picked up photography and it has been one of the most rewarding learning experiences for me. And of late, I began to dabble on baking. Mind you, the process of learning is tough. I failed twice before I made my first successful loaf of bread and gone through bouts of frustration when I can't get a cake rise properly but hey, I do have a lot of fun throughout the whole process. And one of the greatest rewards is when you got it, the feeling is immeasurable, that sense of achievement will boost your confidence to try other things too.

I'm going to keep desiring learning, no matter what my new endeavour might be. I hope you feel the same too.